Determining the Utility and Adaptability of Remote Sensing in Monitoring and Assessing Reservoir Eutrophication and Turbidity for TMDL Assessments

Near-infrared satlellite imagery of Clinton Lake.
Date January 2008 - December 2009
Categories Infrastructure Management, Lakes, Water Resources
Capabilities Analysis of Remote Sensing Data, Geospatial Database Development, Visualization
Contact Debbie Baker
Funding
Kansas Department of Health and Environment
Location Clinton, Hilsdale, Centralia, and Louisburg-Middle Creek Lakes in eastern Kansas

Summary

KBS examined 4 Kansas reservoirs out of a pool of reservoirs that have been identified by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment-Watershed Planning Section (KDHE) as exhibiting impairment due to turbidity and eutrophication: Two large lakes (Clinton Reservoir and Hillsdale Reservoir); and two small lakes (Centralia Lake and Louisburg-Middle Creek Lake) were selected as they are typical of impoundments found across much of EPA Region 7. See the QAPP for more details. The scientific objectives include:

  • Develop statistical models between turbidity, Secchi disk, total suspended solids, chlorophyll a, total phosphorus (TP), and spectral reflectance values;
  • Evaluate and compare the models developed in this study with models described in the scientific literature;
  • Examine both within-reservoir variability and between-reservoir variability in predicted water quality parameters;
  • Sponsor one regional workshop to both share methodologies developed in this project and the outcome models while providing opportunities for the presentation of other regional remote sensing efforts related to TMDL development and monitoring.

Data

Click to download database (MSAccess 2003).

Analysis, Results, or Reports

Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPP) Revision 2, Aug. 2009 (pdf)

USEPA Region 7 2010 Impaired Waters and Watersheds Conference - Determining the Utility and Adaptability of Remote Sensing in Monitoring and Assessing Reservoir Eutrophication and Turbidity for TMDL Assessments, Jakubauskas, Huggins, and Baker (pdf)

Semi-annual report (pdf)

171. Huggins, D.G, M. Jakubauskas, D.S. Baker, T. Hammer. 2010. Determining the Utility and Adaptability of Remote Sensing in Monitoring and Assessing Reservoir Eutrophication and Turbidity for TMDL Assessments. Open-file Report No. 171. Kansas Biological Survey, Lawrence, KS. 58 pp.

Maps, Images, or Photos

Skipper Paul & First Mate Scott with the Campbell 5000 VanDorn holder.
Clinton Lake sampling sites. Red dots = Phase 1 (June & July sampling); green dots = Phase 2 (Aug-Nov sampling).
Near-infrared satlellite imagery of Clinton Lake.
Resulting model of red reflectance and TSS.

Staff

Donald Huggins

PI, Central Plains Center for BioAssessment

Mark Jakubauskas

CoPI, Kansas Applied Remote Sensing Program

Debbie Baker

CoPI, Central Plains Center for BioAssessment

Jerry deNoyelles

CoPI, Kansas Biological Survey

Contracts

Determining the Utility and Adaptability of Remote Sensing in Monitoring and Assessing Reservoir Eutrophication and Turbidity for TMDL Assessments

January 2008 - present

Funding

Kansas Department of Health and Environment